Latest Entries
On International Right to Know Day, a Call to Declassify Migrant Massacres in Mexico
Human Rights / Transparency

On International Right to Know Day, a Call to Declassify Migrant Massacres in Mexico

Yesterday, on International Right to Know Day (#IRTKD2014), our friends at the Foundation for Justice (FJEDD) and Article 19 (A19) in Mexico launched a brand new website calling on Mexico’s Attorney General (PGR) to follow the law and declassify investigative files pertaining to the 2010 and 2011 migrant massacres in San Fernando, Tamaulipas, as well as … Continue reading

Archive Staff Nominated for Gabriel García Márquez Award
Intelligence / News

Archive Staff Nominated for Gabriel García Márquez Award

We’re pleased to announce that National Security Archive investigators Michael Evans and Jesse Franzblau have been officially nominated for the Gabriel García Márquez Award for news coverage (“Cobertura”). The nomination was based on a joint investigation between the Archive’s Mexico project staff and MVS Noticias revealing newly-declassified evidence of a secret U.S. espionage facility in Mexico City. Nine … Continue reading

Mexican Prosecutor’s Office Ordered to Release Records on San Fernando Massacre
Human Rights / Transparency

Mexican Prosecutor’s Office Ordered to Release Records on San Fernando Massacre

This week, Mexico’s new information commissioners for the first time ordered the federal prosecutor’s office to open certain investigative files relating to the discovery of some 200 bodies in mass graves in the state of Tamaulipas in April 2011. The victims, many of them migrants headed toward the U.S-Mexico border, were pulled from intercity buses … Continue reading

Four Years Later, Mexican Migration Agency Makes First Disclosure on 2010 San Fernando Massacre
Human Rights / Transparency

Four Years Later, Mexican Migration Agency Makes First Disclosure on 2010 San Fernando Massacre

INM Invokes Human Rights Clause of Mexican Access Law; Says Right to Information is “a Fundamental Human Right”; Cites Presumption of Disclosure Nearly four years later, Mexico’s federal migration agency has for the first time released declassified files on the August 2010 San Fernando massacre—in which 72 migrants were pulled from buses in Mexico’s northern … Continue reading

U.S. Officials Doubted Mexico’s “Rescue” of Migrant Laborers
Labor trafficking / Mexico's Southern Border

U.S. Officials Doubted Mexico’s “Rescue” of Migrant Laborers

Case fell into “gray area” between labor exploitation and trafficking, according to U.S. Embassy The recent exposure of inhumane conditions in overcrowded U.S. migrant detention centers, now overwhelmed with tens of thousands of migrant children seeking refuge from violence and instability in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, has refocused attention on the root causes of migration, the brutal … Continue reading

“At least we’re better than Mexico in our FOIA policy, right?”
Border Security / Transparency

“At least we’re better than Mexico in our FOIA policy, right?”

Here’s a good example of why we take the time to file access to information requests on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border and how this strategy sometimes encourages governments to disclose information on migration and border security policies that they would otherwise withhold from release. One objective of our two-country FOI strategy was to … Continue reading

New Report, Declassified Documents, Highlight Security Concerns at “Mexico’s Other Border”
Border Security / Terrorism

New Report, Declassified Documents, Highlight Security Concerns at “Mexico’s Other Border”

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) closely monitors a special class of migrants in Mexico—known as Special Interest Aliens (SIAs)—that are thought to have ties to terrorist groups, according to a declassified document obtained by the National Security Archive and cited in an important new report on Mexico’s southern border published this week by the … Continue reading