Mexican Court Orders Release of Documents on Massacre Investigations
Human Rights / Transparency

Mexican Court Orders Release of Documents on Massacre Investigations

Judge Rules Mexican government must disclose evidence of grave human rights violations Migrant killings in Tamaulipas, Cadereyta, prima facie human rights violations Landmark decision upholds right to truth, cites “interest of society” in “avoiding impunity and the repetition of such acts in the future” This post was co-authored by Michael Evans and Jesse Franzblau of the … Continue reading

FOIA Notes / Human Rights

Mexico’s Transparency Reforms, Part II: The selection of new IFAI commissioners and access to information on migrant rights

Mexico’s Senate is now in the process of selecting the country’s new information commissioners who will be at the center of pivotal transparency and human rights decisions for years to come. The competition is intense, with 158 candidates vying for the seven top positions at the Federal Access to Information Institute (IFAI). Continue reading

Three Years Later, Still No Justice for 2011 San Fernando Killings
Human Rights

Three Years Later, Still No Justice for 2011 San Fernando Killings

On April 1, 2011, Mexican authorities discovered the first of several mass graves in Tamaulipas state that all told would contain the bodies of nearly 200 people. The victims, many of them migrants headed toward the U.S-Mexico border, were pulled from intercity buses and executed by the Zetas criminal organization with the alleged complicity of … Continue reading

Mexican court orders a new review of the San Fernando massacre
Human Rights

Mexican court orders a new review of the San Fernando massacre

In a case that has important ramifications both for access to information and for human rights investigations in Mexico, a federal judge declared last week that the country’s information commissioners can and should determine whether an infamous 2010 massacre of 72 migrants in Tamaulipas state by alleged agents of the Zetas drug cartel might constitute a grave violation of human rights under established international legal norms. Continue reading

Migrant Massacre Focus of Legal Effort against Mexico’s Human Rights Commission
Human Rights

Migrant Massacre Focus of Legal Effort against Mexico’s Human Rights Commission

Declassified State Department Cables Among Evidence Supporting Claim Citing violations of the Mexican constitution, international treaties and Mexican law, victims and surviving family members of the 2010 San Fernando massacre, along with the Fundación para la Justicia (FJEDD) and other groups, have initiated legal action against Mexico’s National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) and are challenging … Continue reading

“Near total impunity” for Mexican Cartels “in the face of compromised local security forces,” U.S. Cable
Human Rights / Transnational Crime

“Near total impunity” for Mexican Cartels “in the face of compromised local security forces,” U.S. Cable

Four months before the feared Zetas drug cartel kidnapped and murdered 72 migrants in northeastern Mexico, the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City said that narcotrafficking organizations in that region operated with “near total impunity in the face of compromised local security forces.” As the date of the massacre drew nearer, another U.S. agency, the Drug … Continue reading

Secrets of the Tamaulipas Massacres Come to Light in Proceso Magazine
Human Rights / Transnational Crime

Secrets of the Tamaulipas Massacres Come to Light in Proceso Magazine

In this week’s edition of Proceso magazine, award–winning journalist Marcela Turati uses a set of declassified U.S. diplomatic cables from our Mexico/Migration Project collection to shed new light on what she calls “the collusion of Mexican municipal, state and federal officials” with the murders of hundreds of migrants in and around San Fernando, Tamaulipas, by a … Continue reading